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2003 film by Rakesh Roshan

Koi… Mil Gaya

Theatrical release poster

Directed by Rakesh Roshan
Screenplay by
  • Sachin Bhowmick
  • Dearest Irani
  • Robin Bhatt
  • Rakesh Roshan
Story by Rakesh Roshan
Produced past Rakesh Roshan
Starring
  • Hrithik Roshan
  • Preity Zinta
Cinematography
  • Sameer Arya
  • Ravi K. Chandran
Edited by Sanjay Verma
Music by Rajesh Roshan

Product
company

Filmkraft Productions

Distributed by Yash Raj Films

Release date

  • 8 August 2003 (2003-08-08)

Running fourth dimension

157 minutes[1]
Country Republic of india
Linguistic communication Hindi
Budget 250–350 million[a]
Box part 823.iii one thousand thousand[6]


Koi… Mil Gaya

(Hindi pronunciation:
[ˈkoːɪ mɪl ɡəjaː];
transl.
 I take plant someone…), also known as

KMG
, is a 2003 Indian Hindi-linguistic communication science fiction moving-picture show directed and produced by Rakesh Roshan. Information technology stars Hrithik Roshan and Preity Zinta, with Rekha in a supporting role. In addition to writing the story, Rakesh Roshan too wrote the screenplay with Sachin Bhowmick, Dear Irani, and Robin Bhatt.
Koi… Mil Gaya
focuses on Rohit (Hrithik Roshan), a developmentally disabled human who contacts an extraterrestrial existence with his late father Sanjay’south (Rakesh Roshan) computer. The film follows his human relationship with Nisha (Zinta), Rohit’south friend, who falls in love with him.

After the release of the commercially and critically successful romantic pic
Kaho Naa… Pyaar Hai
(2000), Roshan wanted to piece of work again with his son Hrithik on a different blazon of film. In June 2001, during the 2nd IIFA Awards, he appear the second pic when he received the Best Manager laurels for
Kaho Naa… Pyaar Hai. Main photography was shot by Ravi 1000. Chandran and Sameer Arya from November 2001 to March 2003 on sets congenital by Sharmishta Roy in Canada, India, and New Zealand. Roshan’southward blood brother, Rajesh Roshan, composed the pic’s soundtrack and background score. American artists Mark Clobe and Craig Mumma spent

forty million

(US$500,000) on its visual effects.

Filmed on a budget of

250 one thousand thousand

(U.s.a.$3.1 1000000) to

350 million

(US$four.iv 1000000),
Koi… Mil Gaya
was released on 8 Baronial 2003 and was the first instalment of the
Krrish
franchise. Promoted with the tagline “You Are Non Alone…”, it targeted children and parents. It was the 2nd-highest-earning Indian motion picture of the year, grossing

823.3 million

(U.s.a.$10 1000000) worldwide. The pic had a positive critical reception, with about of the praise directed at the cast’southward performances. Two sequels (Krrish
and
Krrish three) were released in 2006 and 2013, respectively. A fourth instalment, announced in 2016 and scheduled for release in December 2020, was postponed because of the COVID-nineteen pandemic.

The recipient of several awards,
Koi… Mil Gaya
won three National Moving picture Awards (including Best Movie on Other Social Bug). At the 49th Filmfare Awards, it was nominated in eleven categories and received five awards, including All-time Film, Best Director (Rakesh Roshan), and Best Actor and Best Actor (Critics) (Hrithik Roshan). The film won five of its eleven nominations at the 5th IIFA Awards, including Best Director (Rakesh Roshan) and Best Histrion (Hrithik Roshan). Considered a milestone of its genre, it is one of the first Indian films featuring aliens. The grapheme of Jadoo became popular, and inspired a spin-off series entitled
J Bole Toh Jadoo
(2004).

Plot

[edit]

Scientist Sanjay Mehra has created a calculator from which he sends variations of the syllable
om
into space, hoping to attract extraterrestrial life. When he believes he has finally received a response, the scientific community ridicules him. While Sanjay is driving dwelling house, frustrated, an alien spacecraft appears overhead. He drives off the road and the car explodes, killing him. His pregnant wife, Sonia, is injured but survives; their son, Rohit, is born with a developmental disability. Sonia learns that surgery is the only cure for Rohit’southward disability, but it could paralyze or kill him. Not wanting to lose her son, she raises him in Kasauli.

A young woman, Nisha, arrives and is initially combative to Rohit because of his childish applied jokes against her. Her friend, Raj, and his four friends assault Rohit and intermission his kick scooter; Sonia chides them for assaulting Rohit, saying that he did not intentionally brand fun of her. Realizing her mistake, Nisha gives Rohit a bike and introduces him to her parents, who are sympathetic to him. Rohit and Nisha (now friends) find Sanjay’south quondam computer, and Rohit inadvertently summons the aliens. The aliens get out hastily, accidentally leaving a group member behind. Rohit, Nisha, his immature friends, and Sonia befriend the conflicting, naming him Jadoo and discovering his psychokinetic abilities.

Raj resents Nisha’s closeness to Rohit, bullying him and spreading a rumour that Raj and Nisha are getting married. The rumour upsets Nisha and Rohit, who is injure considering he thought Nisha was his girlfriend. Jadoo discovers that Rohit is disabled and uses his powers, derived from sunlight, to enhance Rohit’s mental and intellectual power. The adjacent morning, Rohit has clear vision; a 7th-standard student, he later on solves an oral tenth-standard mathematics problem (surprising his mathematics instructor and his school master).

Rohit’s physical abilities increase to superhuman levels. Raj and his friends challenge Rohit and his friends to a basketball game. Rohit scores several baskets, and Raj and his friends brainstorm to cheat; when the lord’s day comes out, Jadoo helps Rohit and his friends win the game. Rohit tells Nisha that he loves her, and she returns his affection. Raj’s friends confront Rohit’s friends well-nigh the basketball game. Rohit’s friends flee, dropping Jadoo. Lawman Chelaram Sukhwani sees Jadoo in a bag and calls for backup. Led by Inspector Khurshid Khan, they capture the bag; however, Rohit rescues Jadoo. Confronted by Raj and his friends, an aroused Rohit overpowers them and the policemen go far. Jadoo is non in the bag; he had escaped when Chelaram was calling the other police officers.

Khurshid, suspicious of Rohit, confronts him at his house with other officers. The police seize Jadoo and knock Rohit out. When he regains consciousness, Rohit catches up to the police cars in time to salve Jadoo from being sent to the United States. The flying saucer which he had summoned with his father’s reckoner returns, and Rohit bids a sad good day to Jadoo. When Jadoo leaves, Rohit reverts to his old cocky; this saves him from prosecution by the regime, who congratulate him for his actions.

Raj and his friends later harass Rohit, challenging him to kick a ball to them. Rohit angrily kicks the ball into Raj’south face after Jadoo permanently returns his superpowers. Rohit and Nisha give thanks Jadoo, and become married.

Cast

[edit]

The cast is listed below:[seven]
[eight]

  • Hrithik Roshan as Rohit Mehra
  • Preity Zinta as Nisha
  • Rekha equally Sonia Mehra
  • Prem Chopra as Harbans Saxena
  • Rajat Bedi every bit Raj Saxena
  • Johnny Lever every bit Chelaram Sukhwani
  • Mukesh Rishi every bit Inspector Khurshid Khan
  • Akash Khurana as the school principal
  • Rajeev Verma as Nisha’south begetter
  • Beena Banerjee as Nisha’due south female parent
  • Anjana Mumtaz every bit Mrs. Harbans Saxena
  • Hansika Motwani as Tina
  • Anuj Pandit Sharma equally a Sikh child
  • Rakesh Roshan as Sanjay Mehra (cameo appearance)

Production

[edit]

Development

[edit]

Following the success of the romantic thriller
Kaho Naa… Pyaar Hai
(2000), the manager Rakesh Roshan wanted to interact again with his son, Hrithik Roshan, who starred in the film aslope the debutante Ameesha Patel.[9]
[ten]
The manager wanted his next projection to exist a child-centric film, not just a romance, which Rakesh Roshan had done many times in his career both every bit a director and histrion.[9]
[11]
He told Bollywood Hungama that he was motivated to make a picture that was not “run-of-the-mill” but “an out-of-the-box yet entertaining, mainstream film”, after attending the premiere of
Lagaan
in June 2001 during the 2nd IIFA Awards.[12]
He announced information technology afterward at the ceremony while he was receiving the Best Manager honour for
Kaho Naa… Pyaar Hai.[xiii]
The idea to make a film on extraterrestrial life came up when he saw his five-year-onetime granddaughter watching a series about it on a cartoon network.[14]
He later informed Hrithik Roshan of the projection when the latter was shooting the 2001 release
Yaadein
in Delhi; Hrithik Roshan accustomed the part immediately.[12]

Rakesh Roshan used a “K” as the film’s initial, his favourite letter he used in all of his directorial ventures.[14]
[15]
The film was originally titled
Koi Aap Jaisa
(transl.
Someone Like You
),
Koi… Tumsa Nahin
(transl.
No Ane… is Like You
), and
Kaisa Jaadu Kiya
(transl.
What Kind of Magic
), before
Koi… Mil Gaya
(transl.
I Accept Found Someone…
)—which sounded more romantic to him than any of the previous titles—was finally called.[16]
[17]
He wrote the screenplay with Sachin Bhowmick, Dearest Irani, and Robin Bhatt.[14]
This took betwixt two and three weeks before its get-go draft was done in Khandala.[12]
Unfamiliar with the topic, Rakesh Roshan confessed he was initially reluctant and doubtful of the project, but Hrithik Roshan convinced him.[eighteen]
According to Rakesh Roshan, the screenwriters were “contributing new ideas since the premise itself was then new”.[xiv]
He described it every bit “a very emotional, thematic film” and “the greatest challenge” of his life, saying that science fiction was not the main theme of the film.[11]
[19]
Javed Siddiqui finished the dialogue.[twenty]
Koi… Mil Gaya
was produced by Rakesh Roshan under Filmkraft Productions, which he established in 1980, and distributed by Yash Raj Films.[21]
[22]

Casting

[edit]

Hrithik Roshan in 2016

Preity Zinta in 2013

When
Koi… Mil Gaya
was appear, Rakesh Roshan said that his son Hrithik Roshan and Preity Zinta would play the lead roles in the movie;[13]
[23]
it marked the actors’ second collaboration later
Mission Kashmir
(2000).[24]
[25]
Playing confronting blazon, Roshan was cast as the developmentally disabled homo Rohit.[26]
He admitted the office had reminded him of his childhood, proverb he could eat as many chocolates as he wanted and “became a baby and everybody was so caring towards me”.[27]
Hrithik Roshan chosen it the “near challenging role” of his career,[28]
[29]
but revealed he had accepted the part after his father first offered information technology to him, confessing that his excitement fabricated the role experience much easier.[30]
In a retrospective interview with
Mint, he explained that he “revisited that earlier passion I had felt when I did my outset movie”.[31]
To provide an accurate portrayal, Hrithik Roshan lost 8 kilograms (18 lb), changed his hairstyle, and wore loose apparel to cover his well-built torso.[16]
[27]

Zinta was given the role of Rohit’s friend and then-wife, Nisha, afterward Rakesh Roshan saw her xx-minute performance in Mani Ratnam’due south 1998 thriller
Dil Se..
and was impressed by it.[32]
[33]
It was originally to exist played by Aishwarya Rai Bachchan or Kareena Kapoor; still, he saw that Rai Bachchan would not be a suitable co-actor as she was older than Hrithik Roshan, while Kapoor opted out because she had collaborated with the actor on many projects.[34]
Zinta, who enjoyed her part as Nisha and called
Koi… Mil Gaya
a special film for her,[35]
[36]
described the function as an endeavor to alter her “conventional heroine” image, telling Rediff.com that: “If I but did the glam-and-pout act, I would accept stuck out like a sore pollex and destroyed the motion picture’due south timeless texture.”[37]
The part proved to be a new claiming for her, and she constitute information technology to exist her career’south “toughest” role as it was “a very-controlled grapheme”.[38]
Hrithik Roshan spoke positively of his rapport with her, and said he would “accept been only one-half constructive” if she was not his co-star.[39]

In July 2001, Rekha joined the cast and portrays Rohit’s mother Sonia, a part that was specifically written by Rakesh Roshan for her.[40]
[41]
Rakesh Roshan recommended she play the character every bit shortly as he had finished writing the film’s screenplay.[14]
“I didn’t even accept a back-up artiste in listen for her role. If she had turned me down, I wonder what I would’ve done”, he told
Filmfare.[42]
Discussing the motion-picture show and its casting with the printing, Hrithik Roshan said that she was the best on-screen mother and called her “marvellous”.[43]
Rekha saw that her office was “not too big”, but believed that the part’s maternity attribute made information technology “worthwhile”.[44]
The movie was her 2nd project with Zinta following
Dil Hai Tumhaara
in 2002;[45]
it also reunited her with Rakesh Roshan after both had worked together on several films such equally
Khubsoorat
(1980) and
Khoon Bhari Maang
(1989).[30]
After Anil Kapoor, Jackie Shroff, and Rishi Kapoor rejected the role, Rakesh Roshan decided to play the minor role of Rohit’s male parent and Sonia’s husband, the scientist Sanjay.[xvi]
[41]
The film marked his comeback to interim post-obit the 1999 comedy-drama
Mother.[32]

Indravadan J. Purohit got the part as the alien Jadoo. According to him, Rakesh Roshan had offered the role to 30 or 40 people before he gave information technology to him without any screen tests. To prepare, Purohit lost several kilograms of weight, joined a gym, and followed a strict diet.[46]
Iv months before the beginning of shooting, he went to Australia to model his 15 kilogram (33 lb.), three foot (about one metre) animatronical mask, which was created past the Australian artists James Colmer and Lara Denman from Bimini Special Effects Studios.[46]
[47]
They were both emotional when Rakesh Roshan narrates the film’s screenplay, and they later showed a number of sketches for the mask that took a half-60 minutes each to draw.[12]
[xiv]
The mask took virtually a year to build.[47]
[48]
and price

100 million

(US$1.3 meg).[49]
Considering the mask was heavy, Purohit needed oxygen later on shooting every one of his scenes to avoid suffocating. Having starred in more than 300 films (all of which characteristic him in comic roles), he idea with
Koi… Mil Gaya
he got “a role of a lifetime” and considered the pic to exist a career heave.[46]

Filming

[edit]

Primary photography for
Koi… Mil Gaya
began on 12 November 2001, in Film City, during the Dhanteras celebration.[50]
The total upkeep ranged from

250 million

(Us$3.1 million) to

350 million

(Us$4.four million), making it the about expensive film Rakesh Roshan had made at the time.[49]
Ravi Thou. Chandran and Sameer Arya were the cinematographers, while Sharmishta Roy was the production designer. Rocky Star and Komal Shahani designed the costumes for the rest of the bandage. Farah Khan, Raju Khan, and Ganesh Hegde served as the choreographers, and Allan Amin and Tinu Verma did the action direction.[7]
A mall replica was congenital in the film complex for the film’due south xiv-day shooting schedule.[fifty]
A schedule in Canada was completed after iii days. In September 2002, the entertainment portal Bollywood Hungama reported that the film was 40 percent completed.[49]

Chandran used shadows and smoke to make the film’due south sets expect dark for the scenes that feature aliens, equally he faced difficulties shooting those scenes in vivid calorie-free. The spaceship, in which Jadoo visited Earth in the moving picture, was designed by Colmer and Denman and built in a year.[51]
[52]
During filming, Hrithik Roshan was likewise shooting 3 other projects—Na Tum Jaano Na Hum
(2002),
Mujhse Dosti Karoge!
(2002), and
Main Prem Ki Diwani Hoon
(2003).[39]
Koi… Mil Gaya
took place in Bali, Rajasthan, Bhimtal, Western Europe, Kasauli, Nainital, and New Zealand.[53]
[54]
In 2018, Rakesh Roshan revealed its climax sequences were shot in two different versions: in the first one, Rohit lost all of his powers after Jadoo left Earth, while in the second, Rohit did not lose them. Afterwards hearing opinions from many directors (such as Aditya Chopra, Karan Johar, Subhash Ghai, and Yash Chopra, he decided to use the 2d ending, presuming the audience would exist satisfied by it.[12]

Shooting ended in March 2003,[55]
and
Koi… Mil Gaya
was edited past Sanjay Verma.[7]
With help from the Bangalore-based visitor Compudyne Winfosys, the American artists Marc Klobe and Craig Mumma, who previously collaborated on the science fiction films
Independence Mean solar day
(1996) and
Godzilla
(1998), were involved in the special effects.[14]
[51]
They were enthusiastic about their first Bollywood project, and Rakesh Roshan asked them to be thrifty;[14]
they spent

40 1000000

(U.s.a.$500,000).[2]
Withal, the director confessed that the film’s full price was nevertheless excessive for him and attributed this problem to the special effects and making Jadoo’s costumes.[19]

Soundtrack

[edit]

Koi… Mil Gaya
Soundtrack anthology by

Rajesh Roshan

Released 11 June 2003
Genre Feature-film soundtrack
Length
47:54
Language Hindi
Label Saregama
Rajesh Roshan chronology
Love at Times Square

(2003)

Koi… Mil Gaya


(2003)
Aetbaar

(2004)

Rajesh Roshan composed the soundtrack and background score for
Koi… Mil Gaya. Having worked with his brother Rakesh Roshan several times, he said that this one was more difficult than his other compositions; he used the same technique he employed in
Kaho Naa… Pyaar Hai.[56]
Ibrahim Ashk, Nasir Faraaz, and Dev Kohli wrote the lyrics, while Udit Narayan, 1000. Due south. Chithra, Alka Yagnik, Tarsame Singh Saini, Shaan, Kavita Krishnamurti, Baby Sneha, Adnan Sami, and Preeti Uttam Singh performed the vocals.[57]
The album was sold for

50 million

(US$630,000) to Saregama who released information technology on 11 June 2003.[57]
[58]

Critical response to the album was positive, and Rajesh Roshan confessed he had never received that much appreciation.[56]
[59]
Joginder Tuteja of Bollywood Hungama concluded, “In all, the music … doesn’t disappoint. Though we may not be able to compare its music with the earlier
Kaho Naa… Pyaar Hai
by the same squad, it has its share of plus points going in its favour.”[threescore]
Planet Bollywood’s Anish Khanna declared “Jaadoo Jaadoo” every bit the all-time song from the soundtrack album.[57]
In a less-positive review, Narendra Kusnur from
Mid-Mean solar day
opined that information technology “loses out on consistency”.[61]
The Hindu
concluded the title song was “the unique selling point” of the film, referring to it as a “sonorous number”, praising Chithra’s singing.[62]
The critic added, “The lyrics of all the songs are elementary and easily understandable. Rajesh Roshan is able to impart a certain freshness to the music.”[63]

According to the film-trade website Box Office Bharat, the soundtrack album sold two.1 million copies and became the 4th-highest-selling Bollywood soundtrack of the twelvemonth.[64]

Track list[57]
[65]
[66]
No. Title Lyrics Vocalizer(due south) Length
1. “Koi Mil Gaya” Ibrahim Ashk Udit Narayan, M. S. Chithra 7:xiv
ii. “Idhar Chala Mein Udhar Chala” Ibrahim Ashk Udit Narayan, Alka Yagnik half dozen:07
3. “Jaadoo Jaadoo” (Part 1) Ibrahim Ashk Udit Narayan, Alka Yagnik v:55
iv. “Instrumental Theme” Preeti Uttam Singh 4:32
five. “It’s Magic” Ibrahim Ashk Tarsame Singh Saini 5:50
6. “En Panchhiyon” Nasir Faraaz Shaan, Kavita Krishnamurti, Baby Sneha half-dozen:33
7. “Jaadoo Jaadoo” (Part 2) Ibrahim Ashk Adnan Sami, Alka Yagnik 5:55
viii. “Haila Haila” Dev Kohli Udit Narayan, Alka Yagnik 5:48
Total length: 47:54

Marketing and release

[edit]

Koi… Mil Gaya
was one of the nearly anticipated Indian films of 2003, owing to its science fiction genre, one rarely used by whatsoever Bollywood films earlier, and the grapheme Jadoo.[67]
[68]
Promoted with the tagline, “You Are Not Lonely…”, the film was targeted at children and parents.[69]
[70]
The teasers, created by the Bombay-based company Prime Focus, were aired on television for a week.[69]
The Central Board of Flick Certification finished the censorship review of the film on 25 July and gave it a “U” (suitable for all age groups) certification.[71]
Koi… Mil Gaya
garnered high expectations from trade analysts as well, which left Hrithik Roshan restless.[72]
After seeing its promotional trailers, Komal Nahta, the editor of the trade magazine
Film Information, reported: “This has been my gut feeling ever since I heard the narration of the film concept. Simply the magic of the film comes across even through the promos.”[67]
Amod Mehra said that the film’due south themes would successfully attract an audience, giving “adults … a take chances to relive their childhood”.[67]
Sharing the same sentiments, the critic and film trade observer Taran Adarsh added that “the combination of Hrithik, Rakesh and Rajesh Roshan” would make its opening “bumper”.[73]

A special screening was held for Prime Minister Atal Bihari Vajpayee and Deputy Prime Minister Lal Krishna Advani along with their families on ii Baronial 2003 in Mumbai.[74]
Later watching the film, Vajpayee told Rakesh Roshan that he had made “a very good picture show”.[73]
The film was released theatrically vi days afterwards and clashed with Vikram Bhatt’s
Footpath
and Satish Kaushik’due south
Tere Naam.[14]
[75]
According to Rediff.com’due south Syed Firdaus Ashraf, who attended its premiere in Bombay, he saw that children would continuously shout, “Jadoo! Jadoo!”. He also reported that the film’s tickets were being sold illegally by black marketeers at a higher cost.[76]
As parts of the promotion, MTV managed a special show for the film, titled
MTV Making of the Motion picture
(containing interviews of the bandage and crew) which aired between x and 14 Baronial.[77]
It was screened at the second International Special Picture show Festival (organised past ActionAid) on 14–twenty March 2003 and the 15th NatFilm Festival on 11 April.[78]
[79]
A German-dubbed version was released under the championship of
Sternenkind
(transl.
Star Child
) in Germany, Republic of austria, and Switzerland during Christmas of 2005.[80]

Distributed past Yash Raj Films, information technology was released on DVD on 15 September 2003 in a single-disc pack.[81]
It is also available on CD and VCD distributed by Moser Baer and Eros International, respectively.[82]
[83]
According to an estimate by
The Economic Times
in June 2004, the DVD version had sold around 15,000 units, while for the VCD version sold 150,000 units; the film thus grossed

xl million

(US$500,000).[84]
Eros International released its triple-disc CD version in the NTSC widescreen format too.[85]
The idiot box rights to
Koi… Mil Gaya
were sold to Sony Entertainment Tv set in Feb 2004,[86]
and the worldwide premiere occurred on 24 October.[87]
The flick has been streaming on Netflix and Amazon Prime Video since 30 Nov 2016.[88]
[89]
[90]

Reception

[edit]

Box office

[edit]

Koi… Mil Gaya
was successful at the box office, due to the audition’s sympathy for Hrithik Roshan’due south graphic symbol equally a man with developmental disability. Merchandise analysts speculated the film would be an “acid test” for the actor.[91]
[92]
The film was released on 450 screens across India and grossed

22.v meg

(US$280,000) on its opening solar day, the year’s second-highest first-day earnings.[93]
It grossed

64.5 meg

(Usa$810,000) by the end of its opening weekend,[94]
and

129 million

(US$1.6 million) after its kickoff week.[95]
Koi… Mil Gaya
earned

724.ix million

(Us$9.1 million) in India, becoming the highest-grossing Indian film of 2003.[96]

Abroad, the motion picture did not attract much of an audience. As reported by Rediff.com, it debuted in 29th place in Due north America, where it was released on 55 screens, and grossed less than $300,000 later on a 3-day run.[97]
Following its first weekend, the moving picture had collected

32 million

(US$400,000).[98]
Information technology earned

98.four million

(U.s.a.$1.2 one thousand thousand) later on finishing its overseas theatrical run, becoming the fifth-highest-grossing Indian movie of the yr.[99]
Summarizing the moving picture’s total gross in India and overseas, the moving-picture show-merchandise website Box Office Bharat estimated
Koi… Mil Gaya
grossed

823.3 million

(US$10 million), making it 2003’due south 2nd-highest-grossing Indian film.[100]
[101]

Critical response

[edit]

Koi… Mil Gaya
opened to a positive critical reception, with most critics applauding the cast’s performances (especially that of Hrithik Roshan).[91]
[102]
Rekha and Zinta’s performances were panned; several critics found them to be “utterly wasted” serving only as the film’s “decorative slice[s]”.[103]
In spite of that, Rekha’south performance was ameliorate received critically.[104]
The film received a rating of 75 percent on Rotten Tomatoes based on viii reviews, with an average rating of 5.4 out of 10.[88]
Udita Jhunjhunwala of
Mid-Day
observed, “You walk into
Koi… Mil Gaya
expecting to detect a mysterious alien, what yous cease upwards discovering is a child inside you.” She praised Roshan for his performance in “his bravest role”.[105]
Bollywood Hungama noted, “Hrithik Roshan dominates the show and packs in a power-packed performance. The function of a mentally challenged person is no breeze, but the actor takes to information technology like a fish takes to h2o. He manages to pull off the zero-to-hero routine exceptionally well. As an player, he scales dizzier heights with this splendid performance.”[106]
Rediff.com’s R. Swaminathan called the actor “the turbojet that propels the flick to the realm of the extraordinary”, and believed that the film’s screenplay and dialogues gave his character “flesh and blood”.[107]
Withal, he felt Jadoo’south pattern was “a big letdown”, saying that it was “plasticky” and “does non exude life”.[108]

Writing for
The Afternoon Despatch & Courier, Deepa Gahlot described
Koi… Mil Gaya
as “a nifty demo of the Bollywood style of filmmaking”, but criticised its scientific inaccuracy.[109]
Manjulaa S. Negi of the
Hindustan Times
was non satisfied by the special effects and compared them to
Independence Day
(1996).[110]
Screen
‘s
editor Bhawana Somaaya appreciated Hrithik Roshan’s performance, finding it to be “very sincere” and “dauntless”; she also took note of the film’s “refreshing” subject.[111]
Sharing a similar view, Dinesh Raheja felt Hrithik Roshan had delivered “a cherish-worthy performance”.[112]
Both critics added the child actors, who accompanying Hrithik Roshan’s character throughout the pic, contributed positively to his operation.[111]
Ziya Us Salam was certain Rekha was underdeveloped and Lata Khubchandani, in her review for Sify, questioned why she was cast for the function;[113]
[114]
Khalid Mohamed, who gave the film iv stars, presumed that Rekha’southward office made her “restrained”—an opinion shared by Nahta.[115]
[116]
Of Zinta’due south operation, Nahta opined: “Preity Zinta does not have a very pregnant office in terms of the value she adds although she has a running role. She looks pretty and acts well.”[116]
Vijay Venkataramanan of Planet Bollywood appreciated Rekha’southward strong chemistry with Hrithik Roshan.[117]

Chitra Mahesh from
The Hindu
commended Hrithik Roshan and the cast of the children, while referring to the character Jadoo as “amateurish”.[118]
In his five-star review published by B4U, Parag Chandrabala Maniar lauded the efforts of Rakesh Roshan “to provide pure and clean entertainment” and Kolbe’south and Mumma’southward special effects. He said of Hrithik Roshan, “[He] proves his versatility as an role player. At times he moves you and at others he makes y’all express mirth. Here’due south is (sic) definitely an histrion to reckon with. The number of flops all the same, Hrithik Roshan is here to stay.”[119]
Meenakshi Rao of
The Pioneer
complimented his acting style, considering him to exist “endearing, as endearing every bit a child of his mental age”.[120]
The Times of India
‘s
Omar Qureshi elaborated, “Hrithik blows away all doubts, theories, criticisms and atheism with an extraordinarily touching functioning of a mentally challenged male child in a rough homo’s world. He surprises you with his reserves of pathos, his gamut of emotion and his transition from weak male child to strong man. Here is a sterling act, worthy of all awards this year—thus far. He is only incredible, even in his voice modulations, his sloppy walk and his lopsided smile.”[121]
An Indo-Asian News Service critic wrote that the pairing of Hrithik Roshan and Preity Zinta took “the couple conventions of Hindi cinema far beyond the escapades of typical Hindi picture palace”.[122]

Overseas critics focused their attention on Hrithik Roshan’s performance and the film’due south themes.[123]
Grady Hendrix of
Picture show Annotate
commented that the film was an “embarrassment of riches”, summarising, “… it’south mockable, it’s silly, it’s cloaked in a cloying miasma of cute, simply its off-handed facility with pop-movie theatre conventions, spiced up with some jarring stylistic disconnects, delivers the most heed-bending amusement experience of the flavor. This is commercial moviemaking taken to its logical, mondo mercantilist conclusion.”[124]
Grand. J. Simpson expressed approval of the entire cast, especially Hrithik Roshan, whom he regarded equally the picture show’s “oddest aspect”.[125]
Calling it “brilliant, loud and relentless fun”, Jürgen Fauth gave the film iii-and-a-half-out-of-five stars and reviewed its comedic, romantic, science-fictional, musical, action, and melodramatic elements positively.[126]
Empire
magazine hailed it as the “virtually novel Bollywood movie of the twelvemonth”.[127]
The BBC’south Manish Gajjar described Hrithik Roshan’s role every bit a “mentally-retarded-child-[turned]-superman-hero”.[128]
Derek Elley praised him for avoiding his typecasting as a romantic hero,[129]
while David Parkinson of
Radio Times
thought that the film served as “slick, sentimental amusement”.[130]
Writing for
TV Guide, Maitland McDonagh singled out Jadoo’s expression in the scene where he is lost in a woods for praise.[131]

Accolades

[edit]

Koi… Mil Gaya
won 3 awards at the 51st National Film Awards, including National Film Award for Best Film on Other Social Bug tied with Prakash Jha’s crime flick
Gangaajal.[132]
At the 49th Filmfare Awards, the movie was nominated for xi categories including All-time Extra (Zinta), Best Supporting Extra (Rekha), All-time Functioning in a Comic Role (Johnny Lever), and Best Music Manager (Rajesh Roshan).[38]
[133]
It went on to win v trophies including Best Film, Best Director for Rakesh Roshan, and All-time Actor and Best Thespian (Critics) for Hrithik Roshan.[133]
At the 6th Bollywood Movie Awards, Hrithik Roshan received Best Actor and Best Player (Critics), while Rekha was acknowledged as the year’s Best Supporting Actress.[134]
The film won 5 of eleven nominations at the fifth International Indian Flick Academy Awards, including Best Director (Rakesh Roshan) and All-time Thespian (Hrithik Roshan).[135]
It likewise earned v Screen Awards,[136]
five Zee Cine Awards,[137]
four Producers Guild Film Awards,[138]
and ii Stardust Awards.[139]

Legacy

[edit]

Koi… Mil Gaya, often abbreviated as
KMG,[140]
has been widely regarded as the first Indian science fiction film with alien characters in it, although this was disputed by several motion picture experts. In
The Liverpool Companion to World Science Fiction Picture
(2014), professors Jessica Langer and Dominic Alessio wrote that the Tamil-language movie
Kalai Arasi
(1963) should be given the title.[141]
:56
Writing for
The New York Times, the critic and writer Anupama Chopra stated that
Koi… Mil Gaya
was “Hindi cinema’south outset major science fiction film.”[142]
The BBC reported that the picture show “is certainly a milestone in the reformation of commercial Indian cinema as a whole”,[143]
and the American graphic artist Aaron Marcus, in his 2014 book
Design, User Experience, and Usability: Health, Learning, Playing, Cultural, and Cross-Cultural User Experience
called it the near popular Bollywood science fiction motion-picture show.[144]
:75
In 2016,
Mint
featured
Koi… Mil Gaya
on its lists of “Children’s Solar day: ten Memorable Bollywood Films”[145]
and “Ten Bollywood films Dealing with Inability”.[146]

Afterwards making his debut in
Kaho Naa… Pyaar Hai
(2000), Hrithik Roshan starred in a serial of romantic films, about of which under performed financially including
Yaadein
(2001),
Aap Mujhe Achche Lagne Lage
(2002), and
Na Tum Jaano Na Hum
(2002).[147]
Trade analysts believed that his career was concluded by these failures.[fifteen]
[148]
The release of
Koi… Mil Gaya, which Hrithik Roshan wanted to revive his career, changed analysts’ perspectives of the histrion and suggested that the film resurrected his position in the industry.[12]
[149]
While attention its premiere, Nahta told Rediff.com that information technology was “very important for him. Hrithik is not ‘out’ of the industry but his position is shaky. So, if the audience likes the film, it is practiced for him.”[76]
In 2010,
Filmfare
mag included his performance on their list of “fourscore Iconic Performances” of Hindi movie theatre, writing, “Information technology’s incredible how the actor manages to diminish his size, unstylise his look, wear bug-eyed glasses and talk funny … Watch him laugh, cry or bond with his remote controlled conflicting friend and annotation his nuanced turn.”[150]
He and Zinta collaborated over again in the state of war drama
Lakshya
(2004), which failed at the box office although he received positive feedback.[151]
[152]
In 2005, Zinta chose
Koi… Mil Gaya
as i of her favourite films.[153]

The moving-picture show was remade into a soap opera in Indonesia under the title
Si Yoyo
 [id]
(2003–2007).[154]
Following the picture show’s success, Jadoo became pop with children. Nickelodeon India aired a spin-off television series based on the graphic symbol, titled
J Bole Toh Jadoo, in 2004.[155]
In 2020, afterwards the United states Department of Defense published footage of an unidentified flying object, cyberspace memes relating to the moving picture went viral; near of them utilise the scene where Rohit summons aliens by his father’s calculator.[156]

Sequels

[edit]

Koi… Mil Gaya
is the first installment in the
Krrish
franchise.[157]
In November 2004, in an interview with Subhash K. Jha of Rediff.com, Hrithik Roshan announced that his father, Rakesh Roshan, had begun the production of a sequel to
Koi… Mil Gaya, based on a screenplay which was written in eight or nine months.[158]
[159]
A superhero film titled
Krrish, Hrithik Roshan would play a dual role, reprising his office as Rohit from the original motion-picture show and playing the character’s eponymous son. While Rekha besides reprised her part in the sequel, Zinta’s position as the female atomic number 82 was given to Priyanka Chopra.[160]
Produced on a budget of

500 million

(US$6.3 million),[161]
principal photography started in March 2005 and finished in Jan 2006.[159]
[162]
Krrish
opened on 23 June 2006 to mixed reviews,[163]
with critics were disappointed by the replacement of Zinta.[160]
However, the film was a commercial success and became the second-highest-grossing Indian moving picture that twelvemonth, earning more

1 billion

(US$13 meg).[164]

A second superhero sequel,
Krrish 3, was appear in December 2006.[165]
Hrithik Roshan and Chopra reprise their roles, while Vivek Oberoi and Kangana Ranaut play the antagonists. The film was originally scheduled to exist released as a 3D film, but the idea was scrapped.[166]
Although Rakesh Roshan never officially confirmed its budget, reports from the media estimated information technology to be above

1 billion

(The states$xiii meg).[167]
Filming took place betwixt December 2011 and June 2012.[168]
[169]
Krrish 3
premiered on 4 November 2013 and was declared a commercial success, emerging as the fourth-highest-grossing Indian movie of the twelvemonth.[170]
[171]
Critics panned its lack of originality, although Hrithik Roshan’s operation garnered praise.[172]
As of July 2021[update], the 4th successor
Krrish 4
was to be released at Christmas 2020 simply was postponed because of the COVID-xix pandemic in India.[173]

Run into too

[edit]

  • Science fiction films in Republic of india

Notes

[edit]


  1. ^

    Animation World Network and trade analyst Sreedhar Pillai of
    The Hindu
    estimated the full upkeep of
    Koi… Mil Gaya
    at

    250 meg

    (United states of america$3.i 1000000) and

    300 million

    (US$3.8 million), respectively;[two]
    [3]
    The Indian Express
    reported that it was

    350 million

    (The states$4.four million),[4]
    but Rakesh Roshan told Shradha Sukumaran of the
    Express
    that the cost was over

    300 million

    (United states of america$iii.8 million).[5]

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External links

[edit]

  • Koi… Mil Gaya
    at IMDb
  • Koi… Mil Gaya
    at Box Office Mojo



Source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Koi…_Mil_Gaya